Biography

I completed a B.A. (Hons) in Political Sociology, an M.Sc. in Sociological Research, and a Ph.D. in Sociology, all at Lancaster University between October 2006 and July 2013. My postgraduate studies were funded by the ESRC.

In August 2013, I moved to the Sociology Department at the University of Manchester and taught (amongst others) a postgraduate course on the Sociology of Consumption developed by colleagues in the Sustainable Consumption Institute. During this time I applied some of the ideas that I worked on in my doctoral thesis to developing a practice-theoretical approach to public health and to the preparation of a project on how the everyday rhythms of large institutions make patterns of demand for energy and travel – Institutional Rhythms.

In September 2015, I was appointed to one of Lancaster University’s 50th Anniversary Lectureships and moved back to the Sociology Department at Lancaster. Between 2015 and 2017 I worked on the project Institutional Rhythms project, as well as on various other aspects of the DEMAND Centre (one of the six, large, EPSRC funded End Use Energy Demand Centres).

I am currently Co-I on the EPSRC funded The Centre for Research into Energy Demand Solutions (CREDS) working on the Flexibility theme and leading a project on the time-dependence and institutions. I continue my research in the area of public health and am particularly interested in developing a practice approach to thinking about obesity.

I am also the Director for Teaching and Learning in Sociology at Lancaster. Part of that work involves a revision of our core modules and undergraduate and postgraduate programmes, as well as the introduction of an exciting new support programme for our undergraduate students, called the ‘Experiencing Sociology Programme (ESP)’.

This year I am the convenor for the first-year course: ‘Introduction to Sociology’ where I also teach an introductory block on ‘Sociological Approaches to the Study of Consumption’.

When I’m not working, I enjoy keeping fit, practising martial arts, and trying to readĀ  philosophy!

Advertisements